Little Reds fly home

Little reds flying foxes leave the Sunshine Coast.

The little red flying-foxes which called the Sunshine Coast home for the past three months have flown home for winter.

These nomadic flying-foxes this week migrated back to Northern and Western Queensland to give birth and raise their young.

An unprecedented 35,000 adult flying-foxes flew into our region and set up camp in February.

Sunshine Coast Council Environment Portfolio Councillor Jenny McKay thanked residents for helping to make this ecologically important species welcome.

“Most people are aware that these cute little flying-foxes are really doing it tough at the moment, with heat stress events and drought in the west,” she said..

“These climatic changes are why we saw more come into our neighbourhoods this year seeking food and shelter.

“They truly are amazing creatures and do an incredible job of propagating our forests – they play a critical role in long distance pollinating and dispersing seeds in our bush and forests, helping increase wildlife habitat and keeping our forests genetically healthy.”

Sunshine Coast Council’s routine monitoring last week confirmed the absence of the little red flying-foxes. They are unlikely to return again until next year.

“We know that little reds generally only stay on the Sunshine Coast for a short time of 8-12 weeks to feed on our beautiful local flowering plants, and then they return to their maternity camps around Easter holidays,” Cr McKay continued.

“I tend to think of these critters as the fly-in fly-out workers of the nocturnal world, migrating as the seasons change and flying out from their camps at dusk to pollinate and spread seed from flowering or fruiting plants.”

Council sincerely thanks communities and residents for their tolerance and neighbourly respect for the visiting little red flying-foxes.

If you find an injured flying-fox or other wild animal, please do not touch the animal, and call RSPCA on 1300 ANIMAL (264 625).

 

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